Warp Layer Layer

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Somes of the screenshots needs to be updated with 0.64.0

Layer distortion warp icon.png

About Warp Layers

The warp layer is a simple but powerful distortion layer. In a few words it takes a rectangular portion of the resulting render of the layers that are behind it and maps the four corners of the rectangle to four arbitrary points in the plane. It is a 2D -> 2D transformation.

To keep the object in place when apply the perspective, you need to set the corners of the perspective destination properly around the object. Notice that the source rectangle must be centered on the object, to achieve a good effect.

If source == destination then object is not warped.

Parameters of Warp Layers

The parameters of the warp layers are:

Name Value Type
Type vector icon.png Source TL -2.00000u,2.000000u vector
Type vector icon.png Source BR 2.00000u,-2.000000u vector
Type vector icon.pngDest TL -1.800000u,2.100000u vector
Type vector icon.png Dest TR 2.20000u,-2.000000u vector
Type vector icon.png Dest BR -2.20000u,-2.000000u vector
Type vector icon.png Dest BL 0.00000u,0.000000u vector
Type bool icon.png Clip
bool
Type real icon.png Horizon 1.00000 real

Source TL

The Top Left corner (vertex) of the source that is going to be mapped.

Source BR

The Bottom Right corner (vertex) of the source that is going to be mapped. Combined with Source TL it defined the "Source rectangle".

Destination TL

The Top Left corner (vertex) of the destination where the source is going to be mapped.

Destination TR

The Top Right corner (vertex) of the destination where the source is going to be mapped.

Destination BL

The Bottom Left corner (vertex) of the destination where the source is going to be mapped.

Destination BR

The Bottom Right corner (vertex) of the destination where the source is going to be mapped.

Clip

When checked (boolean) it only maps the pixels which lie inside the "Source rectangle".

Horizon

For infinite layers (gradients, checkerboard, etc.) it define (Real) where to stop rendering the points of the vanishing point.

  • From 0.0 to 1.0 it renders all the points that are backwards on the perspective (in opposite direction to the vanishing point).
  • From 1.0 to +infinite it renders the points that go in the same direction of the vanishing point.

High values of Horizon make Synfig spend a lot of time rendering and the result is slightly visibly better.

Some Samples

Here are a few sample images of the result of applying the warp layer over a checkerboard layer.

Before distortion:

Image:warp1.png

The handles of the warp layer. The dotted lines represent the Source rectangle. Notice how it corresponds to a 4 by 4 section of the checkerboard:

Image:warp5.png

The resulting distortion (horizon = 15.0 and Clip = off). The destination rectangle can be seen to contain the same 4 by 4 section of the checkerboard that the source rectangle contains:

Image:warp3.png

You can see that the rendered horizon is the result of connecting the two vanishing points of the perspective distortion. In this case there are two vanishing points given by the intersection of the lines that connects the following points:

  • Intersection of the line that passes by Destination TL point and Destination TR point with the line that passes by Destination BL point and Destination BR point. It gives vanishing point V1 (not shown in the diagram because it is outside the visible area, far off to the left).
  • Intersection of the line that passes by Destination TL point and Destination BL point with the line that passes by Destination TR point and Destination BR point. It gives vanishing point V2

Connecting the Vanishing points V1 and V2 gives the horizon line.

See the diagram:

Image:warp7.png

To understand how the Horizon parameter works see this animated image. It moves the Horizon parameter from 0.0 to 30 in four seconds. Notice that from horizon = 0.0 to 1.0 it renders from minus infinite to the current observer position (it is made very fast in the animation, and takes about in 4/30 seconds and most of the time the rendered section is outside the visible area of the canvas - you can see it if you place a zoom out layer on top of them). This means that the portion of plane that is behind the observer point of view is rendered deformed and then very enlarged). Notice too that from horizon = 1.0 to 30.0 it renders the rest of the visible plane. As the horizon parameter gets larger, the final visible horizon gets further away.

Image:warpsample2.gif

The Clip parameter

This image shows what you will get when check it on. Only the pixels from inside the Source rectangle are mapped. In this case, the 4 by 4 section of the checkerboard.

Image:warp6.png

Turning warp on/off

Simply set the destination handles to the same position as the source handles.


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